Wednesday, July 11, 2018

Alien in the Delta

Alien in the Delta

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD

Alien in the Delta by Thankful Strother is a memoir of notable events and observations from the author's life. It is a short, yet entertaining book which gives readers a glimpse into a particular period of American history.

Strother shares a series of memorable events throughout his lifetime. Some of them feature well-known events, such as his reaction to JFK's assassination, while others are personal memories. The stories run the gamut from early home life to first kiss, from a stint in the US Air Force to the purchase of income property. The combination of facts and the author's thoughts and feelings, make for interesting reading. Several personal photos are scattered throughout the book.

Written more as personal memoir than conventional autobiography, Strother, shares with the reader both a personal narrative of facts and feelings in a concise and credible 200-page work.

Strother's time line comes against the familiar backdrop of recent American post-World War II history, including the segregation, prejudice and inequality that was synonymous with the times and growing up in the Arkansas Delta.

To his credit, Strother doesn't solely focus on the hardness of the times he grew up in. He shares in equal parts his feelings of amusement, happiness and sense of humor. He rises above stereotypical thinking, reflective, but never bitter about adversity he faced.

Strother's narrative brings the contrast of the rural South to experiences he had later in life, such as living in Germany in the 1960s and later being in the corporate world, where he worked for such tech giants as NCR Corporation and AT&T.


While Strother says he is not a speaker or advocate, his impressive resume later in his life -- and his success story -- lends itself to being equal parts inspirational and theatrical as his story is one of coming up from relative poverty to have a successful military and corporate career. "I am really not advocating for anyone; I just wanted to tell these stories of things I experienced, and I feel that in itself is a wonderful accomplishment. There were excitement, humor and history with those times," he said.

Thursday, May 31, 2018

**FREE BOOK SPECIAL** SUNDAY 6/3/2108

The Adult - Alien in the Delta

Growing up on Welfare

I will never forget the word “Commodities.” My father would go to the county’s food-distribution site to pick up our family’s share of government food when I was in elementary school; we called it commodities. Today it is called food stamps. You couldn’t hide your poverty back then; it was out there for everyone to see. You had to stand in line to claim your portions of food. Sometimes, the line was so long that it would curve around the corner of the block. It was a reminder that you couldn’t even feed your loved ones without the help of the government. It was embarrassing and humiliating for most people to stand in that line. The only consolation was that almost every family in town was standing there. Even though most families received some assistance, the children would make jokes and tease each other about eating commodity cheese. Once each month, my father went to pick up various items: sugar, powdered milk, flour, butter, canned meat, and yes, commodity cheese. Almost every family in Arkansas received some assistance from the government in the 1950's.

My parents also received Aid to Dependent Children (ADC) money for my care. To receive aid, you had to live below the poverty line. During the time that I was on welfare, a social worker would visit our house every six months. The worker would spend time questioning my parents about how they had used the money on me. The social worker would speak to me alone, away from my parents. She had a long list of questions that she asked me. The issues were mostly about the ADC money spent on food, clothing, and shelter. I always resented being put in a position to report on my parents. The ADC checks stopped when I turned sixteen years old.

Wednesday, May 23, 2018

FREE -The Soldier - Alien in the Delta - FREE

The Soldier - Alien in the Delta


I love my country, The United States of America. But I discovered at an early age that my country did not like me. I had to leave the USA and live in Germany to find equality. 

After we completed our Air Force basic training, six buddies, four white and two black young men from Detroit headed back home on the train.


Someplace in Texas, the train stopped so that we could stretch our legs and get a snack. We were all dressed in our pristine, new blue uniforms, proudly representing the United States Air Force. All of us got off the train and went to the restaurant to get something to eat. Before we sat down, the waiter said as he looked at our black faces. “We can’t serve you in here. You will have to go out back to order and pick up your food.” 


Born and raised in the South, I had experienced discrimination before, but this time it hurt me deeply because I was dressed in my US Air Force uniform and was prepared to die for our country, and yet my fellow countryman still would not serve us.

Segregation was the law in the southern United States in 1962. No one should ever have to experience that kind of treatment! We just got back on the train without eating and sat in silence. 


We began basic training as six buddies from Detroit. When we returned, we had experienced very different treatment from the same country that we had pledged to give our lives for if necessary. Because of that experience, I discovered the country did not like me. However, I still loved my country!


The Soldier - Alien the Delta is the second book in the series. The short stories are compelling, thoughtful and humorous about various experiences in the US Air Force, international travel, romance and interracial marriage.


The Alien in the Delta Series by Thankful Strother is about the author's life as a poor black boy growing up in the Delta. The three book series represent different time periods. They include The Child, The Soldier, and The Adult.


Thankful Strother's story of his life experiences is moving and profound. He does a remarkable job of bringing the reader into his world. While reading his stories, I felt like I was in the room with him as he shared the details of all his adventures.





Saturday, May 5, 2018

FREE BOOK The Child-Alien in the Delta FREE BOOK

Free Today Saturday, May 5, 2018 

Grandfather shot the man as he opened the gate to the front yard. The man died on the spot. After killing the man, my grandfather went into hiding for seven years.

This event was the legacy left to my father by his father. Would what happened thirty years before my birth have an impact on my life? 

The Child - Alien in the Delta is about the author's life as a poor black boy growing up in the Delta. The stories run the gamut from early home life to discovering girls, kissing, sex, and music, learning to dance, experiencing everything for the very first time. It is a short, yet entertaining book which gives readers a glimpse into a particular moment in the growth and development of an adolescent.

Alien in the Delta Series by Thankful Strother are memoirs of notable events and observations from the author's life. They are short, yet entertaining books which give readers a glimpse into a particular period of American history.

The Soldier - Alien the Delta is the second book in the series. The Adult - Alien in the Delta is third and the last book. The short stories are humorous and compelling about a stint in the US Air Force, an interracial international marriage, real estate investing and becoming a successful corporate executive with NCR and AT&T Corporation.

Strother's timeline comes against the familiar backdrop of recent American post-World War II history, including the segregation, prejudice, and inequality that was synonymous with the times and growing up in the Arkansas Delta.

To his credit, Strother doesn't solely focus on the hardness of the times he grew up in. He shares in equal parts his feelings of amusement, happiness, and sense of humor. He rises above stereotypical thinking, reflective, but never bitter about the adversity he faced.



Tuesday, November 14, 2017

FREE BOOK OF THE DAY! ********** TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2017



I love my country, But I discovered at an early age that my country did not like me. I had to leave The USA and live in Germany to find equality.

With basic training done, six young men from Detroit headed back home on the train. Someplace in Texas, the train stopped so that we could stretch our legs and get a snack. The six of us got off the train and went to the restaurant to get something to eat. We were all dressed in our pristine, new blue uniforms, proudly representing the United States Air Force. I walked into the restaurant with all my buddies, and before we could sit down, the waiter looked at the other black serviceman and me. He said. “We can’t serve you in here. You have to go out back to order and pick up your food.” Born and raised in the South, I had experienced discrimination before, but this time it hurt me deeply because I was dressed in my US Air Force uniform and was prepared to die for our country, and yet my fellow countryman still wouldn’t serve us. Segregation was the law in the southern United States in 1962. No one should ever have to experience that kind of treatment! We just got back on the train without eating and sat in silence. We began basic training as six buddies from Detroit and returned as four white and two black airmen.



Sunday, November 12, 2017

FREE BOOK OF THE DAY! ********** TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2017


I love my country, But I discovered at an early age that my country did not like me. I had to leave The USA and live in Germany to find equality.

With basic training done, six young men from Detroit headed back home on the train. Someplace in Texas, the train stopped so that we could stretch our legs and get a snack. The six of us got off the train and went to the restaurant to get something to eat. We were all dressed in our pristine, new blue uniforms, proudly representing the United States Air Force. I walked into the restaurant with all my buddies, and before we could sit down, the waiter looked at the other black serviceman and me. He said. “We can’t serve you in here. You have to go out back to order and pick up your food.” Born and raised in the South, I had experienced discrimination before, but this time it hurt me deeply because I was dressed in my US Air Force uniform and was prepared to die for our country, and yet my fellow countryman still wouldn’t serve us. Segregation was the law in the southern United States in 1962. No one should ever have to experience that kind of treatment! We just got back on the train without eating and sat in silence. We began basic training as six buddies from Detroit and returned as four white and two black airmen.


Saturday, September 23, 2017

09-29-2017 Alien in the Delta Series



CONGRATULATIONS! FREE GIFTS FOR YOU! 
The Alien in the Delta Series - all three e-books free on Amazon!
Friday and Saturday September 9/29 and 9/30/2017

No automatic alt text available.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00XM1NGVE/ref=series_rw_dp_sw